Thursday, May 9, 2013

Nationals overturn controversial rainout ticket policy amid fan outcry


The Washington Nationals have overturned their new rainout ticket policy after receiving heavy criticism from both fans and the media.

The controversy began late Tuesday night when Washington's game against the Detroit Tigers was rained out and scheduled to be made up this Thursday at 4:05 p.m. local time. Under their rainout policy created this year, the team informed fans that they would not be able to exchange their tickets for an equal or lesser priced ticket to a future game of their choice. Instead, the Nats mandated that those tickets from Tuesday would only be honored for the makeup game on Thursday, which is scheduled to begin three hours earlier than the one from Tuesday.

Naturally, this presented a predicament for a lot of folks holding tickets from Tuesday's affair, because they aren't able to attend an afternoon game because of work and other restraints.

Now, the Nationals have decided to revert back to their old policy, a more conventional one, after listening to the outcry from their angry fans.

“We heard our fans,” Nationals COO Andrew Feffer said. “I think it’s always important from a customer service standpoint to listen. We responded quickly and decisively. We said, if our fans want that option for a future game, if it’s that important to them, we certainly want to provide that.”

Feffer went on to provide some sort of justification for why the Nationals originally decided to approve the new policy, but it appears as though the damage has already been done. The only thing to do is accept the mistake and move on.

“Certainly our intention from the very beginning was to ensure our fans had the best seats and the seats that they had purchased,” Feffer said. “What we had found last year with a lot of our fans who were coming for future game exchanges, a lot of them were disappointed their same seats or same sections weren’t available as attendance had grown. It had always been our intention to make sure, as attendance grew this year, that that would be less of an issue.”

Let this situation be a lesson to the other 29 MLB teams. You always have to put the fans first and foremost. If not, you could end up with an apathetic fan base. The Miami Marlins can attest to this.

Via Big League Stew

2 comments:

  1. I don't understand why a team that may win a champonship soon, doesn't have more fans in their ball park.

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  2. We're too important for that. We don't pay to sit in that tawdry ballpark; we pay to have the RIGHT to sit there if we feel like it. Usually we don't feel like it. Thanks for asking.

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